Consortium of National and University Libraries

Seminars

Open scholarship and open science, the move to openness in research and scholarly environments – what’s it all about?

The CONUL Research Group and CONUL Training & Development Group organised a seminar in August, 2019 to give library staff who don’t work directly in research support an understanding of open science. The recordings of the talks from the five speakers are available for viewing here and give an overview of Open Science/Scholarship, Open Access to Research, Evaluation of Open Science and the How and the Why of Research Data Management.

 

Introduction to Open Science/Scholarship
Breeda Herlihy, Institutional Repository Manager, UCC Library

In this introduction to Open Science/Open Scholarship, Breeda gives definitions of Open Science and the use of Open Scholarship and Open Research to describe the emerging shift in the practice of research across all disciplines. This is followed by an overview of some of components of the Open Science environment such as Open Research Data and Materials, Open Research Software and Open Source and Reproducible Research & Data Analysis.

Open Access to Research Publications

Michael O’Connor, Institutional Repository Officer, QUB Library

Michael takes us through Open Access to Research Publications from defining what it is to placing it in the context of developments in the research landscapes of the UK and Ireland. He also gives an insight into how the library at Queen’s University Belfast supports Open Access at the university.

Evaluating Open Science: monitoring and measuring open academic outputs

Mick Carragher, Research Support Sub-Librarian, UU Library

In this talk, we get an overview of the tools and techniques currently used to evaluate research as well as their limitations. Mick outlines how these measures of research impact will evolve as organisations consider next generation metrics and apply the principles of the responsible use of metrics to the evaluation of open science.

Research Data Management (RDM) – what it is and why it’s necessary

Fran Callaghan, Research Communications Librarian, DCU Library

Fran describes why research data management has emerged as an issue for researchers of today. He illustrates the issues with real world examples of what research data is and why it needs to be managed.

The How of Research Data Management

Aoife Coffey, Research Data Services, UCC Library

After an introduction to Research Data Management, Aoife explains how the seemingly complex task of RDM can be addressed using the framework of the FAIR principles and Data Management Plans. Aoife then outlines how she has developed the in-demand Research Data Service at UCC and lays out a path for future plans.